Another Reason to Eat an Apple a Day…

Diabetes, Gut Health, Health & Wellness, heart disease, Heart Health, Nutrition, Uncategorized

 

The original proverb, “Eat an apple on going to bed and you’ll keep the doctor from earning his bread,” is well recognized in its simplified form (“an apple a day…”) and may now also “keep diabetes away” based on a study released earlier this week.   The new Australian study surveyed dietary habits in more than 7,500 men and women and found that consumption of at least 2 servings of fresh fruits daily was associated with ~35% decrease in developing Type 2 diabetes over the 5-year follow-up period.

Fruits that contributed to this benefit were apples, bananas, oranges and other citrus fruits whereas drinking fruit juice had no effect.   Among the individual fruits tested, only apples were independently associated with lower blood glucose levels and improved insulin sensitivity.

In addition to being a rich source of fiber that slows the absorption of glucose (thereby keeping the pancreas from overworking/overproducing insulin that over time may lead to insulin resistance), apples also contain the flavonoid, quercetin, that suppresses inflammation, a chronic process that promotes insulin resistance.

Because there is a tight intersection between metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, cardiologists are becoming more involved in coordinating care with our diabetes and endocrine specialists.  Ironically, two of the newer classes of medications used to treat diabetes, the SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP1 agonists are being embraced by heart specialists because of proven benefit in reducing cardiovascular risk.

Below are some useful tools to reduce the risk of diabetes and/or lower heart related complications associated with Type 2 diabetes.

  1. A new study suggests that eating  an apple a day may also keep diabetes away!
  2. If you are overweight and prediabetic (fasting blood glucose 100-125 mg/dL), losing 5-7% of body weight is associated with ~50% reduction in conversion to diabetes; losing 10% of body weight correlated with an 85% decreased risk.
  3. The flavonoid quercetin has potent anti-inflammatory properties to combat insulin resistance. Foods with the highest quercetin content include onions, apples, blueberries, broccoli and kale.
  4. Large waist size (at least 35 inches in women/40 inches in men) is associated with a greater than 20-fold increased risk of diabetes compared to smaller waist size (less than 31 inches in women/37 inches in men).
  5. Treatment with the highly purified EPA compound, Icosapent Ethyl reduced the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetics with elevated triglycerides.
  6. Treatment with the diabetic medication known as SGLT2 inhibitors (dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) reduces the combined risk of cardiovascular death or hospitalization from heart failure (with low ejection fraction) in the presence or absence of diabetes.
  7. Treatment with the diabetic medication known as GLP1 agonists (liraglutide, semiglutide, dulaglutide) reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart-related deaths in diabetic patients with a history of heart disease, or in the case of dulaglutide, with or without heart disease.
  8. The GLP1 agonist, semiglutide used to treat diabetes was just approved by the FDA as a weight management drug to treat overweight/obese adults with diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol in addition to lifestyle (diet and physical activity) measures.

Michael Miller, MD is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland and author of  Heal Your Heart….”: published by Penguin Random House. 

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